FOR THE ENVIRONMENT


IT REDUCE S YOUR CARBON FOOTPRINT

It only takes 0.4 pounds of carbon dioxide to produce a cup of broccoli, a cup of eggplant, 4 ounces of cauliflower, and 8 ounces of rice, but it takes 10 pounds of carbon dioxide (25 times as much) to produce just one 6-ounce beef steak.
By eating vegetarian foods, you will help to conserve non-renewable sources of energy.
Fossil fuels are used to transport animals and to power the production of their feed. If everyone in the United States went vegetarian for a single day, they would prevent 1.2 million tons of carbon dioxide emissions and save 70 million gallons of gasoline.

IT CAN SAVE WATER
Meat production, especially the feeding of cattle, is a water-intensive process. The amount of water used by vegetarians is 300 gallons a day as compared to the 4,000 gallons used by non-vegetarians.
Livestock production accounts for over 8 percent of global human water consumption: if everyone in the United States went vegetarian for a single day, they would save 100 billion gallons of water.
Going vegan/vegetarian  also reduces some of the manure, antibiotics, and hormones that find their into our water system.




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IT CAN SAVE LAND
30 percent of the earth's entire land surface is used for raising farm animals: if everyone in the United States went vegetarian for a single day they would save 3 million acres of land and prevent 3 million tons of soil erosion.
A typical meat eater's diet requires 2.5 times the amount of land that a vegetarian's diet does.
A farmer can feed up to 30 people throughout the year with vegetables, fruits, and cereals produced on less than 2.5 acres of land, but if the same area were used for the production of eggs, milk, and/or meat, it would only feed 5-10 people.
Forests in Brazil and other tropical regions are destroyed to make room for raising livestock animals: if the meat industry loses some of its support through veganism/vegetarianism, it will directly save the forests.

Why go Vegan?